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Leadership : Boosting Employee Commitment (Getting Beyond the 9-to-5)

Posted by kevinb on 8/7/18 (73 reads)

Let's get real. You want your people to be resourceful, show initiative, think for themselves, own their jobs, come up with solutions, and then implement them with little guidance from you once they've been trained.

You think you hired the right person with every hire. But once they've been with you for a few weeks, they turn into a 9 to 5'er. They put in their 8 hours, and then are looking to go home. They're friendly, do their responsibilities, but offer no creativity, and don't feel engaged enough to finish a project before leaving for the day.

What's the common element in all these instances? The staff are different. The tasks are different. What's common is you and the culture you've created.

You are the problem. This is where you do some serious soul searching, ask your staff some delicate questions, get some advice and guidance from an executive coach, and see what you can change.

Seven Questions to ask yourself and then your staff:

Personal Improvement : Simple Tools to Fight Stress

Posted by kevinb on 6/12/18 (250 reads)

Chris Kresser is a leader in health, nutrition, and integrative medicine; and recently named as one of the 100 most influential people in health and fitness. I love his article 5 Simple (But Powerful) Tools for Fighting Stress and want to share it with you here.

Chris writes that,"We may not be able to avoid stress, but we can influence how it affects us" and he identifies the four factors that drive our response to stress and simple-but effective-tools for changing how you experience it.

Most people living in the modern world experience continuous stress in the form of daily hassles, relationship troubles, problems at work, chronic illness, or other external life events.

Have you ever wondered why some people are devastated by this stress, while others are relatively unaffected? Or why some people thrive in high-pressure, driven work environments while others self-destruct?

The reason different people respond so differently to the same stressors is that our response to stress is largely defined by perception.

In other words, although there are certain events that virtually all people experience as stressful (such as the death of a loved one), it is our subjective perception of the event-and the meaning that we assign to it-that determines how we respond.

Say you've just had a fight with your partner. If you perceive it as a trivial, passing event with little significance, it is unlikely to trigger a significant stress response. However, if you see it as a sign that your relationship is doomed and will be a lifelong source of unhappiness (okay, I'm exaggerating to make a point!), you can bet that it will trigger a massive stress response.

4 key factors that determine how we respond to stress

Personal Improvement : Communicating with Impact

Posted by kevinb on 5/21/18 (281 reads)

The most effective organizations are those whose cultures emphasize building strong interpersonal relationships, whether internal or external. Doing that requires effective communication.

Communication is Key...

Communication is one of the most fundamental skills we possess as humans. We are social beings who live in an interdependent world. From the most basic survival instinct, like a baby letting her mother know she is hungry, to the complexity of corporate leaders mobilizing a global and diverse workforce, effective communication is the glue that holds us all together and moves us forward.

Dictionary.com defines communication as: "The imparting or interchange of thoughts, opinions, or information by speech, writing or signs". Simple, right? Or not. As we all know, this seemingly straight-forward definition belies a much greater level of complexity.

...and Fraught with Pitfalls

Even when we converse in our native language, misunderstandings and disconnects are common. We've all experienced painful "failures to communicate" with loved ones, friends, and co-workers where the message intended to be sent was NOT the message that was received.

Leadership : Deciding How to Decide

Posted by kevinb on 5/8/18 (347 reads)

There are many skills/capabilities and characteristics that a person needs in order to be an effective manager. To me, any such list should include that a manager:

 1. Consider the possibilities. Critical thinking skills are essential to turn things upside down and inside out to come up with the best possible scenario to solve problems. [Side Note: check out my book summary of "Now You're Thinking" to see how improving your critical thinking skills can "revolutionize your career and transform you life"]

 2. Be decisive. In order to get things done, someone has to make the final decision!

In terms of critical skills for managers, decision-making should always be at or near the top. A track record of good decisions leads to success for the organization and rewards for the manager. Too many poor decisions and that leader won't be a leader for long.

In the old-school view of management, the boss was the "decider". Whether the issue was big or small, strategic or tactical, the manager was the sole authority and was expected to make the judgment call. Inputs might be solicited prior to making big decisions, but that was about the extent of employee involvement.

However, today, a more decentralized, agile and team-based approach is required in our increasingly complex world, where change happens at light speed. Added to that is the impact of Millennials in the workforce who have high expectations for engagement and influence on the organization and, rightfully so, are forcing some changes in how managers make decisions.

Leadership : The High Cost of Poor Executive Hiring Decisions

Posted by kevinb on 4/25/18 (306 reads)

One of the services that I frequently provide is helping companies evaluate C-level job candidates, for positions such as CEO, CFO, COO, CTO, Chief HR Officer, GM, and heads of sales and marketing. Typically, the candidates have been identified and vetted by an executive recruiter or by some other source, and I evaluate "final" candidates or those who otherwise are being seriously considered for the position.

It's likely that you have all seen the statistics about the high rates of failure (or at least disappointment and underwhelm) regarding executive hires or promotions and the enormous cost (both in terms of "real" money and of negative impacts on the company) associated with poor hires and transitions. Executive hiring decisions can have an enormous positive or negative impact, especially on small-to-medium-sized companies, and, not to over-dramatize, but I have seen nearly make-or-break types of outcomes at the company-level.

On that point, Elena Botelho, Shoma Chatterjee and Kim R. Powell have recently published the following article entitled Seemingly ‘Safe' People Bets That Can Trip Up CEOs. It is an interesting and insightful article which identifies common traps executives fall into when selecting team members and some ways to overcome them.

Leadership : For Leaders, Relationships are Key at Work

Posted by kevinb on 4/10/18 (338 reads)

I deal with business owners, C-level leaders, and mid-level managers nearly every day, and a too-common challenge I see is that many view employees more as objects and as a means to an end than as people. More as tools to be directed, managed, and coordinated than resources and associates to be coached, mentored, and developed.

Don't get me wrong - these leaders and managers aren't ogres, but they often tend to "miss the boat" when it comes to promoting the ideas of benefiting others and helping employees achieve their potential.

Leaders are paid to get results, but those who are overly bottom-line oriented don't experience the satisfaction of the journey, and often limit others' sense of fulfillment. Those who focus primarily on functionality take the emotions out of business and underestimate the value of creating harmony and a sense of mission. Those who are too commanding don't emphasize the importance of teamwork and contributing to the success of the group. Those who are overly structured and controlling place constraints on employees' opportunities to explore new ideas and experiment with new methods.

Organizational Excellence : Employee Engagement: Having a Great Day at Work

Posted by kevinb on 3/22/18 (371 reads)

Think about the last time you had a great day at work. What made it great? I like to think that when you have a great day at work, then you've had an engaged day at work. Studies and surveys show, however, that in the U.S., employee engagement is low; with only about 2 in 3 employees being engaged at work. That means that one-third of us (gulp!) are either not engaged or are actively disengaged. Far too few workers in the U.S. are having predominantly great days at work.

BlessingWhite (a Division of GP Strategies) views that an engaged organization is one where employees reach maximum job satisfaction while at the same time make a significant contribution to the goals of their team and the organization as a whole. True engagement happens when there is a mutually beneficial relationship between the organization and the employee, an alignment between what the organization needs (maximum contribution) and what their employees want (maximum satisfaction).

So, what does high employee engagement look like?

Personal Improvement : A "Formula" to Change Your Life

Posted by kevinb on 3/8/18 (598 reads)

Ok, are you ready for a bit of a "deep dive"? I want to take you beyond the go-go-go of your day-to-day life and have you step back from the seemingly endless items on your to-do list (at home or work) ...at least for a few minutes. It is so easy to get caught up in our daily goings-on and we can quickly fall into "autopilot" mode; where we are seemingly merely going through the motions.

In June of last year, there was a terrific article in Forbes entitled The Hidden Cost of Operating on Auto Pilot - which you can access here.

The author's final statement is: "It's time we all took a long collective breath and decided to live our lives more purposefully, more intentionally, more mindfully. By design, not by default."

I agree, wholeheartedly. And I believe that a simple "formula" can help:

 

Organizational Excellence : 11 Commandments for an Enthusiastic Team

Posted by kevinb on 2/16/18 (883 reads)

In cleaning out some old files, I came across a single sheet of paper with a typed list entitled "11 Commandments for an Enthusiastic Team." I couldn't recall its source, but a Google search led me to a book by Ian Percy of the same name (subtitled Collaborating with Purpose and Passion), published in 2003.

Regardless of the age of this list, these 11 items are all still relevant today, so I wanted to share; along with some comments of my own.

1.  Help each other be right - rather than wrong

It's easy to over-rely on who's supposedly right and wrong as a determining factor, but what's the bigger picture? Think about what's important and what you are trying to accomplish, rather than feeding your ego or keeping score.

2.  Look for ways to make new ideas work - rather than for reasons they won't

Too often we have the mindset of: "We've tried that before." "That just won't work." "We don't do things that way." Instead, try: "What if we try it again?" "What if we look at it differently?" "Who could we speak with to get a different perspective?" or "What would we do to make this work if it was our only option?"

Leadership : Moral Leadership

Posted by kevinb on 2/9/18 (536 reads)

Fortune magazine, in their September 15, 2017 issue, published an article by Dov Seidman entitled "Four Pillars of Moral Leadership." It is based on the guiding precept that while the rules of engagement in business seem to be ever-changing, there are basic rules of moral leadership that stand the test of time. The following is based on the shortened version which is posted here.

MORAL LEADERS:

1.   Are Driven by Purpose

2.   Inspire and Elevate Others

3.   Are Animated by both Courage and Patience

4.   Keep Building Muscle

 

Driven by Purpose  

More today than ever, the millennial generation demands from their work what is worthy, valuable and noble - connected to human progress or the betterment of the world. Essentially, why do we do what we do? It is the Moral Leader's job to help define the organization's purpose and to share that vision with everyone in the organization. 

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